PAN'S LABYRINTH: THE LABYRINTH OF THE FAUN is here!

Happy publication month to Cornelia’s latest novel, Pan’s Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun!! Published with HarperCollins, Bloomsbury Publishing, and elsewhere around the globe, it ‘s already being received with critical acclaim (including a starred Kirkus Review!), and represents her first fiction collaboration with Guillermo del Toro, the film’s creator.

Read more of what critics are saying by clicking on the links below!

Migration & the Immigrant Experience in Literature

Any week is a good week to talk about the importance of—and need for—the representation of diverse experiences and voices in literature. For much of our history, the canon of literature has been largely white, largely male, largely straight—and very much centered around American and white European voices. But literature can also share the stories of those whose voices have been marginalized and Otherized: those whose stories (like all our stories) are at least in part shaped by their overlapping identities.

At this present moment, at this point in our country’s history, as many (often white, often male) people engage in xenophobia targeted at immigrants of color, we thought it would be a good moment to talk about a few books that center around individual immigrant experiences.

To help those navigating the U.S. immigration system, organizations like RAICES, The Bail Project, KIND (Kids In Need of Defense), and the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights all supply immigrants with legal aid and resources, and do worlds of good with the donations they receive.

What We're Reading Now: SOUTH AND WEST by Joan Didion

Joan Didion’s South and West, published in 2017, is a slim volume excerpted from Didion’s notes during two periods—one in 1970, on a roadtrip in the American South, and another in 1976, around the Patty Hearst trial.

“The idea was to start in New Orleans and from there we had no plan.” This book of essays sends the reader right back to the 70s, with Didion on the road or at the writing desk, yet there’s a sense of timelessness, as if the era these notes were written in wasn’t half-a-century from this. While the pieces Didion may have intended to write in the 70s didn’t pan out, the notes left from each period paint clearly snapshots of both times with full force of Didion’s shrewd yet dispassionate eye for detail.

What We're Reading Now: THE CARRYING by Ada Limón

parenting, and motherhood; and the changing roles we have in the ever-turning cycle of birth, aging, and death. It’s a collection studded with images anchoring the reader to the natural world around the speaker—from trellising tomatoes in the garden, to “the cold salt froth / of the Pacific,”* to watching eagles in a field.

What We're Reading Now: THE REFUGEES by Viet Thanh Nguyen

What are you reading, book-lovers? This month, we’ve started more books we finished, but those we did finish include: The Refugees, a short story collection by Viet Thanh Nguyen; Ada Limón’s most recent poetry collection, The Carrying; and South and West, a slim nonfiction volume by Joan Didion that muses on moments decades past, in (as the title suggests) the American South and in California. A varied bunch!

Pro-Choice Orgs to Support This Week

[Note: today’s blog post is less literary, more civic action-minded. Because, America.]

What a week. These past few years, I think I’ve uttered that phrase every few days. This week’s been no exception. On Thursday, May 16th, the Missouri state Senate passed a bill that "would ban abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy or later, except in cases of medical emergency. There are no exceptions for rape or incest.”

Here are some organizations that help women and folx with uteruses get the reproductive healthcare they have a right to:

Dystopian Fantasy for Our Cultural Moment

It seems like hardly a month goes by without hearing that dystopian literature is trending, or it’s making a comeback, or that a certain classic dystopian novel is selling inordinately well for an octogenarian book. One thing’s for certain—whether you call it dystopian fantasy, YA, or dystopian novels—these stories are here to stay.

Some would say we’re in the golden age of dystopian fiction—probably because many readers turn to books either to understand or escape the dystopia around them.

Writer Spotlight: On the Inimitable Rebecca Solnit

Men Explain Things to Me. Hope In the Dark. A Field Guide to Getting Lost. Storming the Gates of Paradise. The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness. These are just a few of the titles written by the writer Rebecca Solnit, a brilliant prose writer, sharp cultural critic, and vocal environmental advocate.

In addition to writing some twenty-odd books on feminism, western & indigenous history, and power & social change, among other topics…

Independent Bookstore Day 2019

Our favorite April weekend is almost here! Independent Bookstore Day takes place each year on the last Saturday in April, making April 27th the official #IndieBookstoreDay2019! This year, the entire bookish community is celebrating the 5th annual Independent Bookstore Day, with over 500 bookstores across the United States hosting different parties, readings, promotions, and other events.